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Bye-Bye, Beetle
News Bytes 07/10/2019 12 Comments

Today is the end of the road for an iconic rounded car. From playing “punch buggy” on family vacations to viewing old Herbie the Love Bug movies, people love Volkswagen Beetles. Now VW is halting production of the last version of its Beetle model at its plant in Puebla, Mexico.

Over its 81-year history, the vehicle has become part of American—and global—pop culture. The Beetle, aka “Bug,” began as a Nazi project for a cheap, simple, practical “people’s car” (the translation of the German Volkswagen). Later, it became a symbol of Germany's postwar economic recovery and rising middle-class success. Soon the Bug was a global symbol, sold and recognized all over the world. Still today, the car’s landmark design is as recognizable as the curvy Coca-Cola bottle.

The first two-door, rear-engine VW Beetles became available in the 1930s. But due to World War II, few non-military Beetles rolled off the assembly line until the end of the 1940s. These Bugs multiplied quickly: By 1955, there were one million Beetles roaming the Earth.

Production at the Beetle’s birthplace of Wolfsburg, Germany, ended in 1978. Newer front-drive models like the VW Golf took over. But the Beetle wasn't dead yet. Production went on in Mexico from 1967 until 2003—longer than the car had been made in Germany.

The New Beetle—a completely new retro version built on a modified Golf platform—resurrected some of the old Beetle's cute, unconventional aura in 1998. In 2012, the Beetle's design was made a bit sleeker. Today, the last of 5,961 Final Edition versions heads to a museum after ceremonies mark the end of production.

What memories do you have of the VW Beetle?

(VW beetles on assembly lines at the Volkwagen auto works plant, in Wolfsburg, West Germany in 1954. AP Photo/Albert Riethausen, File)

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Most recent comments

First Comment!

NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
I love Beetles! My dad drove a yellow one in high school and I know a couple people who had them. We play a game in the car where whenever we see a yellow car we say bananawack and get a point, but if we see a yellow Beetle we say bananawack jackpot and get five points. I guess the number of bananawack jackpots I see will start slowly going down. :(

No!! I love Beetles! My

No!! I love Beetles! My family has never had one, but I think my uncle has one and I have always thought they were so cute. Goodbye, Beetles! I'm glad they lasted for such a long time!

Oops, sorry, didn't mean to

Oops, sorry, didn't mean to copy Beth G. (at the beginning of my comment)

NONE

NONE

My grandpa had one a couple

My grandpa had one a couple years ago. Beth G, we play a game kind of like that in my family!

WHAT!!??? NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!

Don't get rid of them!! there cute!! We have been trying to get my grandma to get one of those!!

@Lena P

It's fine.

how is that pasibal

How is that possible to do that I do not no how you can do all the thing that you do I am sprints that you can do that like Beetles roaming the Earth. Ok that is cool an not cool there is one more thing like this Over its 81-year history, the vehicle has become part of American—and global—pop culture. The Beetle, aka “Bug,” began as a Nazi project for a cheap, simple, practical “people’s car” (the translation of the German Volkswagen). Later, it became a symbol of Germany's postwar economic recovery and rising middle-class success. Soon the Bug was a global symbol, sold and recognized all over the world. Still today, the car’s landmark design is as recognizable as the curvy Coca-Cola bottle. that is not cool I think if you are ok with this I am not it is like world coming to and end think a bunt it I think that it is not so cool to me another thing that it said was that. reduction at the Beetle’s birthplace of Wolfsburg, Germany, ended in 1978. Newer front-drive models like the VW Golf took over. But the Beetle wasn't dead yet. Production went on in Mexico from 1967 until 2003—longer than the car had been made in Germany.
The New Beetle—a completely new retro version built on a modified Golf platform—resurrected some of the old Beetle's cute, unconventional aura in 1998. In 2012, the Beetle's design was made a bit sleeker. Today, the last of 5,961 Final Edition versions heads to a museum after ceremonies mark the end of production. Do you thank that is not cool
From
Michael Grutzius

NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

My dad looked up the subject and the head of VW said that they might revive them yet again!! there is still hope!!!! so never say never!! @Beth G, my family plays a game like that too!!

@Elodie H

Yay!!!!!

@ Elodie H.

Good! :-)

Too bad

Too bad they were a nice car. All good thing come to a end at least on earth.

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