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Canada Tariffs on U.S. Goods Begin
News Bytes 07/3/2018 12 Comments

On Sunday, Canada began imposing tariffs on many U.S. goods heading north of the border. The fines are retaliation for the Trump administration’s new taxes on steel and aluminum imported to the United States from Canada and other trade partners.

President Donald Trump angered Canada, China, Mexico, and other U.S. allies by declaring imported steel and aluminum a threat to America’s national security. Trump believes that makes those items a reasonable target for U.S. tariffs.

Under Canada’s new fines, some U.S. products, mostly steel and iron, face 25% Canadian tariffs—the same penalty the United States slapped on imported steel at the end of May. Other U.S. imports, from ketchup and lawnmowers to frozen pizza and dishwasher detergent, will face a 10% tariff at the Canadian border, the same as America’s tax on imported aluminum.

“We will not escalate and we will not back down,” says Canadian Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland. Canada is the United States’ second-biggest trading partner in goods, just behind China.

Canadian lawmakers chose many U.S. products for their political impact. For example, Canada imports just $3 million worth of yogurt from the U.S. annually. But most of it comes from one plant in Wisconsin—the home state of House Speaker Paul Ryan. Now the product faces a 10% tax.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau thanked Canadians for standing united against Trump’s sanctions. He urged Canadians to “make their choices accordingly” when considering whether to buy American products.

As part of his America First approach, Trump has repeatedly attacked the trade policies of the United States’ northern neighbor. He cites Canada’s triple-digit tariffs on dairy products, which account for about 0.1 percent of U.S.-Canada trade.

(AP Photo: Chrystia Freeland meets with employees during a visit to a Canadian steel company.)

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Most recent comments

A.R.

Arrgh! I live in Canada and the closest "big" city is a town that survives off of it's steel. The people are not happy that Trudeau helped Canada get tariffs on steel. Also, the few Canadians who I've talked to just laugh about the Canadian tariffs on US imports. They really don't think it will make much of a difference.
As for my view, I think Trump is doing the right thing.

Wade K

However, since Trudeau has already gotten Canada into the trade war, they might as well use the tariffs on the States as well. They can't just boss us around!

Emily K @ A.R

A.R. , Why do you think that Trump is doing the right thing, and Trudeau is not? First Trump taxed Canadian goods, so now Trudeau is taking American goods. Like Chrystia Freeland said, “We will not escalate and we will not back down,”.

Could you explain your statement? Thanks!

A.R. @ Emily K.

What I've heard (and it definitely could be wrong) is that Trump gave Canada so much time to put tariffs on Chinese steel and Canada didn't. So Trump put tariffs on Canadian steel. Then Trudeau decided to put tariffs on American goods to get back at Trump. So, I guess this might be wrong, but if you have more information that could be great!

(do you live in Canada?)

A.R. @ Emily K.

I mean "would be great."

Emily K @ A.R

So, what I understand from your comment is that Trump wanted Canada to put tariffs on Chinese steel, and so when Canada didn't, the US were upset and so put tariffs on Canadian steel. Is that correct?

What I know about what is happening between the US and Europe, (I could have misunderstood), is that there are certain laws about how high taxes you can charge on goods from other countries. Trump wanted Americans to buy more American goods, and so he broke some of those rules and placed higher taxes, (tariffs), on some European goods. Europe retaliated by doing the same to the US. Now Canada is too.

I don't live in Canada, but I am Canadian.

A.R.

Oh, okay. Thanks! Who made the rules about tariffs?

Boooooooooooooooooo!!!!!!!!!!

Boooooooooooooooooo!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Steel is one thing, but

Steel is one thing, but yogurt?

Emily K. @ Older K.

Boo against what Older K? Trump of Trudeau?

@A.R.

wait you live in canada
I have heard the money smells like maple syrup can you confirm this?

Emily K @ Zach W.

I have handled Canadian currency frequently, (on vacations), and I have not noticed that it smells like maple syrup. But I have heard that it does. Strange..

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