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Hot Off the Oxford Press
News Bytes 10/27/2016 586 Comments

Hear Ye! Hear Ye! Oxford University Press' new edition of William Shakespeare's works will credit Christopher Marlowe as co-author of the three Henry VI plays. It’s further evidence that the playwright collaborated with others on some of his most famous works.

Marlowe was born in 1564, the same year as Shakespeare. He was a playwright, poet, and spy for Queen Elizabeth I. Now he’ll share billing in the latest version of the New Oxford Shakespeare being published this week.

Scholars have long suspected that Shakespeare's plays included the work of others. But new methods helped researchers conclude that sections bore Marlowe’s trademarks.

"Shakespeare, like other geniuses, recognized the value of other people," Gary Taylor, a professor at Florida State University and principal investigator of the new work, says. "What is Shakespeare famous for? Writing dialogue—interactions between two people. You would expect in his life there would be dialogue with other people."

In Shakespeare's time, there was great demand for new material for the first mass-entertainment industry. A relatively small group of authors worked feverishly to meet this demand.

A team of 23 scholars looked afresh at Shakespeare’s plays. They used computers to reveal language patterns, trends, and associations—analyzing not only Shakespeare's words, but also those of his fellow authors.

Oxford University Press editors concluded that 17 of 44 works associated with Shakespeare had input from others.

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I'm back! And thanks for

I'm back! And thanks for praying for me- it was soooo fun!!
Welcome to the Typewriters/Typelings club, Corina. Please don't spam though :)

This is wyn

How is everyone doing? Is everyone excited for school!!!!!!!!!!!!! I am (well, mostly excited :D).

@ wyn

YES!!!!!! Super excited for School!!!! I'm actually going to school instead of being homeschooled so that is both exciting and a little nerve racking. My summer has been great, I kind of wish I had more time for writing though. You?

@above

I'm not *super* excited about it, but I'm looking forward to more routine. This will be my third year of school at an online academy, so I've learned it's kind of lonely :(
@Abigail: Wow, that's awesome that you're going to a school! I'll pray that you'll adjust well!

@Everyone

Hey everyone!! I'm back! Sorry, I switched computers. My old one had some login problem so I wasn't able to communicate. Hi to all you new people. How're your books/writing projects going? I'm publishing my second book right now.

This is wyn

Abigail - I wish there was more time for writing too. I hope you have a good time going to school.
Kaitlana -I am also excited to maybe have some kind of routine!
Scarlett - Publishing !?!? That's so cool!!!!!

@Belwyn R

Yep, again. Revising and editing. If you have publishing questions, I'm here.
@Abigail, an author I love gave this tip. Work on your story 500 words a day. It's really helpful. Depending on your handwriting, that can be from 1 1/2 pages to 5. If you think about it, 500 is not a lot. But at the end of the week, it adds up. You'll be making rapid progress and also being consistent. It doesn't take all that time to do it. Hope this helps!!

@ Scar/ From Bella

Publishing! I may have some questions about it, I have a book I'm working on right now. (Can you give me a run down on Amazon publishing) (That's who you use, right?)

@Belwyn R

Amazon is for sales. Publishing is getting the book set, printed, and bound. At seven years old, I published a book called "Little Coop in the Big Woods" about my flock of chickens. (LOL!!!) That book was never sold and the only existing copy is at my house. I never look at it (for certain reasons.) So yeah, publishing is just getting it made into a physical book. Both of my books, (yes, the chicken one too) were self published. Before being printed, you need to have an editor. My mom worked for a magazine so she's been helping me with that. Before the book is grammar checked, you need to make sure that the plot, characters, and anything story-related is all complete. Then you might want to find some friends or family to proof-read to check for any plot inconsistencies. It will be a lot more difficult, trust me, to grammar check your story if that isn't done first. I am not that familiar with type-setting, but you need someone to arrange the words online. Next comes cover art. When I did the Little House knockoff, I drew it in color pencil and had it printed onto the book. So you could definitely design it yourself. Last summer, my cousin helped me find clip-art on Adobe Images for the cover. She assembled it herself. (She is an artist.) After that, you just need to find someone to print your book. I used a company called Blurb. Amazon takes a little more work. You need an ISBN number in order to sell on their website. There is an agency that handles that. I'm pretty sure that you can buy one. You might want to talk to your parents about this part, I'm not too familiar. Once you publish, spread the word! (I'll buy a copy!!) Keeping it to friends and family is fine. If you want to make a profit from your work, then talk to someone other than me. :).
Hope this helps!

P.S. Remember, you can still be a child author and not publish anything until later. The more practice you get now, the better you'll be in the future. Publishing your book is a great experience, but it takes a lot of time.

@ Scar/ From Bella

THANK YOU SO MUCH!!!!!!! :) That was very helpful. I will try to tell you more about it when I get more time! :D

@Bella

Good luck on your story. And take your time on it. It can take an author two years to write a full.

Thanks for the advice

Thanks for the advice Scarlett. It's similar to advice I got on AIO. Eugene Meltsner told Connie to write 1,000 words a day and I'm with Connie on that one it's harder to write when you have that kind of pressure. I definitely prefer the 500 words a day route. I'm using word on my computer and I have 4 pieces of advice for book writing. At least when it comes to Word the 1st time you write you have to manually save it. I learned that the hard way. I had 5 chapters down and forgot to save it before I shut down my computer. When I went back to write more it was gone and I didn't have a backup paper copy. So, 1: always save your work when typing on a computer (word automatically saves it after you manually save it the 1st time) and 2: always write on paper 1st in case you have a computer crash. 3: file your work and name it carefully. I also learned this the hard way when I couldn't find the file I was working on. It took me about 10 minutes to find the file because I had so many. That brings me to my last piece of advice, 4: delete any files you don't need anymore I went through my own files and deleted what I didn't need. It's tough at first because old files can bring back fun memories but you can do it. I also enjoy writing scripts about AIO and DGL. If you have no idea what those stand for they're: Adventures in Odyssey and Down Gilead Lane.

@Sarah D

That is some really great advice. I think what really matters is that you write every day. It's less about how much you do and more that you're putting aside some time to do it daily. Thanks for sharing!!
Does anyone else write on paper?

@writing

Thanks for the advice Scarlett, I generally do writing when I find time for it, and my summer has been crazy busy and so I haven't had time to sit down and either write or type. I do both typing and writing, Sometimes I write first and then type it out, but I've found it a little easier to find and references things in different chapters on a word document, I also use Icloud pages because then I can collaborate with my younger brother. But typing doesn't have the same feel as handwriting everything, so pros and cons. I also like to draw my characters and am working on cover art for one of my half finished books.

Does anyone else find that their stories end up becoming way to big for just one book? I started a book without a clear idea of a plot just going off various fairy tales, and now I am almost 11 chapters in, found a plot that is way more complicated than I expected, and have decided to turn it into a trilogy.

@Abigail H

No, I have never had that experience LOL. But it's great that your plot is developing itself more and more. I hope that all of your stories turn out great. What are you guys reading right now? I'm going to start a book called The Witch of Blackbird Pond soon. Does anyone know that title?

@Scarlett R.

I read that at a co-op once. It was really interesting and good. I liked it. Are you reading it for school or for fun?

@Abigail H.

I'm currently working on my own series. Yes, I know exactly how you feel. I usually get writers block and don't finish though so that's a problem. I'm still going strong though on this one.

@Sara D

That's good that you liked the book! I'm reading it for an American literature class. The best cure for writer's block is to take a break and write something. Have you been abandoning your stories because there's no time to finish or because you loose faith in the story? I have quit many many books. Maybe you just need a really solid idea for a story. Ernest Hemingway wrote, Write one thing. Write about the truest sentence you know. I think that's a great start for a story.

@Scarlett R.

It's kind of both. I'm also usually unprepared and don't know where to take the plot. The school year makes it hard too.

@Sara D

A lot of successful writers have a basic idea of where the plot will got, but details are never planned out. I think that's good! Happy start of school!!

@Scar

THE WITCH OF BLACKBIRD POND IS THE BEST BOOK EVERRRRRRRRRRRRRRR!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :D

@Scarlett and Sara

well I am reading a ton, which is pretty normal for me, I am in the middle of a very weird series called Mrs Peregrines peculiar children, it has some language and kissing scenes but so far I'm liking it. I recently devoured the Keeper of the Lost Cities series, all the books that have been released so far, and am plodding through Tolkien's history of Middle Earth books. Also recently read a world war two historical fiction. On the theology side, recently started a book on Prayer by Timothy Keller. I think that's most of what I'm reading.... I read like a book a day so its hard to keep track.
The witch of blackbird pond is a great book, I read it for school and then read it for fun, I really enjoyed it and hope you like it!
That's cool that you are working on a series. I think my problem on writing is that I get ideas for new stories and so have a ton of starts that I look at and go what do I want to work on today... I would generally suggest finding a plotline (vague or otherwise) pretty soon after you have a story idea, unless you decide to do an experimental story where you don't really have a plot. Often the plot evolves and changes from what it originally was as well. Maybe take a break for a few weeks before going back to where you were stuck, that's what I've done in the past for writer's block.

@Abigail H @Belwyn

Wow, you're really under a reading spell! That's great. I'm just beginning The Witch of Blackbird Pond. It has to be finished on the 31st. I have a friend who loves Keepers of the Lost Cities. Good tip for writer's block. What is Prayer by Timothy Keller about?

@Belwyn, thanks for the enthusiasm!!

@ All/ This is Bella

Hey, do we have a plan on where to move when this article runs out? I found this one if we want something scenic: https://teen.wng.org/node/2339

@ Scarlett

"Prayer" is about a biblical approach to prayer, It was given to everyone in my class by my youth pastor. I just started it last week, So far I'm enjoying it and it has some helpful insight in praying rightly before God. I would recommend it if you are interested!

@Belwyn R

We previously planned on saving this link in case something happened to this page.

https://teen.wng.org/node/3998

@Abiligail H

Aw, cool! That sounds really interesting. I thought it was fiction at first, but non-fiction can be a great read too.

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